Systems and Business Process Writing

Documentation is required for a company to move forward in the development of critical systems and business processes. RUP, UML and SDLC can all come into play here for larger projects so it is good to have a solid analytical and proven methodology for providing quality systems and business documents.

Corporations invest time and money to learn these methodologies and sometimes the benefits and monetary gains are intangible.

Let us say you have a team with expertise in the critical systems and business processes. Their knowledge of the critical systems and processes are accurate and exceeds expectations. The team’s technology skills consist of word processing, spreadsheets and some graphic illustration. From the technical communicator’s point of view, this may very well be a team of SMEs (Subject Matter Experts). The technical communicator with graphic illustration and writing skills can meet with your SMEs and start producing system and business process diagrams after each meeting is completed.

But let us take a closer look at your team. Do they have the time to produce the diagrams? Is there an easy to learn graphics illustration package in-house that a team member can use to illustrate and document the critical paths? If the answer to both of these questions is yes, then this may be a technical communicator project that you can do in-house. If the answer is no, consider a freelance writer to document your critical systems and business path, using the SMEs with a clear understanding of the critical paths.

Clients allocate months for projects that may only need a few weeks if enough thought is put into constructing a documentation solution for a project.

Save time and money by looking at all of your options first.

Sometimes the answers are right in front of your nose!

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Freelance Web Design

Technical communication and writing includes a variety of skills. The basic approach of most technical writers is to add to their skills in a manner that is suitable to their career development.

 

Our technical writers have a liberal arts education (art and photography) as well as application and web programming experience. Therefore, it has been easy for them to add web skills to their training curriculum.

 

JavaScript, Dreamweaver, CSS (Cascading Style Sheets), HTML (Hypertext Markup Language), Flash, Illustrator, Photoshop, Fireworks, InDesign, Microsoft Office, VISIO, and more.

 

To date, we have been contacted for freelance web design as well as writing a variety of business manuals (on-line help and print) for the company website and personnel. This has been a very interesting experience since old documents and sketches become on-line help or PDF down-loadable documents from their website. The business analysis skills used for technical system and application development are useful for analyzing and organizing the new documents our clients are developing.

 

The old and the new are coming together to build a tomorrow, on the Internet, for many companies.

Writing for Business

Analysis related to business writing has evolved through many phases. When looking for freelancers capable of this kind of analysis don’t forget that SDLC (Systems Development Life Cycle) is very similar to UML (Unified Modeling Language) and RUP (Rational Unified Process).

 

If the writer you have chosen has written for SDLC projects they may be worth considering for your business writing projects that require business analysis.

 

Remember, there are also similarities between business writing, technical writing and copywriting so don’t reduce your chances of finding an economical business writer by limiting your choices too much.

The Sixth Phase of the Project

Every project must have an ending rather it is good or bad. For our four week project that should have been six months we now have an unacceptable deliverable but something to start with.

 

Now, it is time to reward the people that didn’t participate in the project. That’s right, this is the reward the non-participant phase.

 

Everyone smart enough or lucky enough not to get involved in the negative aspects of this project will receive a reward. Promotions are in order and celebrations parties are scheduled and work goes on as usual.

 

Hopefully, something is learned from this process and the value of the industry experts will be considered relevant to the project’s success.

Fifth Phase of the Project – Punishment of the Innocent

The guilty have been identified. Management has taken the appropriate action to address employees or vendors that contributed to the demise of this project.

 

The deadline is approaching and management is feverishly meeting with the remaining project team to see what can be done by the deadline date.

 

As long as management continues to take action regarding any issues that impede the project deadline, the better it is for management. No one can mention the mistake that lead to this demise out of fear of being identified as one of the guilty.

 

In addition, management begins to solicit advice and information from people outside of the project team. The objective is to tap every resource available as the deadline approaches. The project is far from perfect but something is always better than nothing.

The Fourth Phase of the Project

Search for the Guilty!

It has become evident that the project is now in jeopardy. Everyone is beginning to see why the project was projected to be six months instead of four weeks. Management is aware that they must now take action to address the issues that will arise from missing the deadline date.

 

The witch hunt begins and the managers spin the bottle.

 

Round, and round, and round it goes, where it will stop, nobody knows.

 

Will the bottle point to you or maybe you over there?  We must identify the guilty parties. Those chosen by management will take the blame, somebody has to.

The Third Phase of the Project – Panic

The rumors are circulating.

 

Promised due dates for early deliverables have not been met and talk of mandatory overtime are abound as employees mill about in conspiratorial whispering at familiar locations.

 

Key technical employees have resigned in a huff, leaving critical staff openings while irreplaceable talent walks out the door, passing an in-stream flow of independent consultants on their way in.

 

Panic has gripped the departments and careers are hanging by an untenable thread as flurries of meetings are conducted much the same way as a military inquisition.

 

The copying machines are now going into overdrive as resumes take priority over project and status reports. Absences are at an all-time high and morale is inversely lower.

Vacations are placed on hold, if not canceled altogether. There is a standing joke among the ranks that simply states: An optimist is a person who brings their lunch to work!